The Prison State of America

Prisons are not about race, although poor people of color suffer the most. They are not even about being poor. They are prototypes for the future. They are emblematic of the disempowerment and exploitation that corporations seek to inflict on all workers.

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We Must Stop Throwing People Away

We spend $80 billion dollars a year incarcerating people, which is 400% more than we spent twenty years ago. Some of the money could be better spent on raising healthy kids, not feeding a morally corrupt network that connects our children in their classrooms to the prison industrial complex.

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Legalizing Oppression

The lynching and disbarring of civil rights lawyer Lynne Stewart is a window into the collapse of the American legal system. Stewart is everything a lawyer should be in an open society. But we no longer live in an open society. The persecution of Stewart is the persecution of us...

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The Over-Policing of America and Criminalizing Everyday Life

Chase Madar TomDispatch.com http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/175781/tomgram%3A_chase_madar%2C_the_criminalization_of_everyday_life/ If all you’ve got is a hammer, then everything starts to look like a nail. And if police and prosecutors are your only tool, sooner or later everything and everyone will be treated as criminal. This is increasingly the American way of life, a path that...

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Imprisoned Pussy Riot Member: Why I Have Gone on Hunger Strike

Nadezhda Tolokonnikova The Guardian/UK http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/sep/23/pussy-riot-hunger-strike-nadezhda-tolokonnikova Beginning Monday, 23 September, I am going on hunger strike. This is an extreme method, but I am convinced that it is my only way out of my current situation. The penal colony administration refuses to hear me. But I, in turn, refuse to back...

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10 Ways America Has Come to Resemble a Banana Republic

Alex Henderson AlterNet http://www.alternet.org/economy/10-ways-america-has-come-resemble-banana-republic?paging=off In the post-New Deal America of the 1950s and ’60s, the idea of the United States becoming a banana republic would have seemed absurd to most Americans. Problems and all, the U.S. had a lot going for it: a robust middle-class, an abundance of jobs that...

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