Action Alert: Net Neutrality for California!

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Tell your California legislators to support net neutrality in California
S.B. 822 would create California’s own rules, filling the void left by Trump’s corporate friendly (de)regulators.

Sign the letter today

A California state senator just introduced the most comprehensive state-level net neutrality bill in the country. It’s the first state bill that includes all of the net neutrality protections that Trump’s Federal Communications Commission (FCC) eliminated. In fact, it’s even stronger than the recently repealed rules.

If passed, the bill would protect Californians and force companies to comply with net neutrality in the country’s most populous state – dramatically increasing the pressure for a return to net neutrality nationwide.

Tell California legislators: Stand up for net neutrality. Support Senate Bill 822 to protect the open internet in California. Sign the letter today!

Now that Trump’s FCC has repealed net neutrality rules, states are picking up the fight. In California, State Senator Scott Wiener has proposed legislation that would require companies to follow net neutrality principles in California. Source: CREDO Action [Local State Senator Jerry Hill is a cosponsor.]

If broadband providers thought that they’d be subject to fewer regulations after the Federal Communications Commission voted in December to jettison its net neutrality protections, they could be disappointed.

California state Senator Scott Wiener on Wednesday introduced a bill that would create a regime in some ways more strict than the Obama-era rules against blocking, throttling, or otherwise discriminating against content. Most important, Wiener’s bill, if passed, would in many cases ban broadband providers from exempting certain content from data limits, a concept known as “zero rating.” For example, AT&T would no longer be allowed to exempt its DirectTV Now video-streaming service from its customers’ data caps while counting data consumed by competing services like Sling TV. The FCC claimed authority to regulate the practice on a case-by-case basis, but never took formal action against it. Source: Wired Magazine

Sign the letter today

 

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