[Intel Report] All the relief money in the world won’t rebuild Houston. Undocumented workers will.

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workers-659885_640Unauthorized immigrants were crucial to rebuilding New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. But it’s a hostile time to be undocumented in Texas. These laborers might not stick around.


Alexia Fernández Campbell, Vox: All the relief money in the world won’t rebuild Houston. Undocumented workers will.

Who is going to rebuild the nation’s fourth-largest city as construction companies nationwide struggle to find workers?

Unauthorized immigrants were crucial to rebuilding New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. And they are likely to be desperately needed as Texas rebuilds to clean streets, demolish buildings, and reconstruct homes and offices.

But it’s a hostile time to be undocumented in Texas. Even beyond the Trump administration’s harsh rhetoric and actions on immigration, Texas leaders are engaged in a crackdown on unauthorized immigrants, passing a slew of laws to make it harder for them to live and work in the state. In such an environment, these laborers might not stick around for the work that will be needed. CONTINUE READING


Amy Goodman, Truthdig: Trump’s Hurricane of Hate

Last weekend, we traveled to Houston to see Harvey’s impact up close. It quickly became clear that we were witnessing the fallout from twin disasters: climate change and racism. Pastor Carlos Caban told “Democracy Now!” that his community had not been visited by the Federal Emergency Management Agency or the Red Cross. Did he feel forgotten? Yes, he replied. CONTINUE READING


Richard Eskow, Our Future: Disaster Recovery Should Heal, Not Divide, Our Communities

The race to capitalize on the disaster, to redistribute wealth upward, and to transform the region has already begun.” The Trump administration, together with the right wing extremists who currently govern Texas, will direct recovery efforts. They are likely to roll back environmental protections – which will make future disasters worse – and further weaken worker protections like the Davis-Bacon Act.

This playbook is familiar to anyone who followed what happened to New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

It’s disaster capitalism, straight out of Naomi Klein’s book The Shock Doctrine: every catastrophe is an opportunity to consolidate wealth and power for the elites, and undermine the public institutions that serve the majority. CONTINUE READING


Photo: Pixabay

 

 

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